Hinds AHS Hosts Open House

You are invited to the Hinds Agricultural High School Open House.  Meet the administration and staff on December 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM.  Anyone interested in enrolling or transferring to Hinds AHS for Spring 2014 is welcome.

For more information please contact Robert Strong, Principal, at  601-885-7047.

HAHS OPEN HOUSE

 

Hinds AHS SGO Donates to Stewpot

SGO members and officers

Hinds AHS SGO members are seated, from left, Darnecia West, assistant secretary from Bolton; Jalisa Mosley, parliamentarian from Edwards; and Shavonta Dixon, secretary from Utica. Standing, from left, are A’Naciya Adams, treasurer, from Utica; Kiara Stimage, Miss Hinds AHS, from Edwards; Dennis Kyles, member, from Bolton; Mr. Bernard Ross, advisor, from Utica; Denarrius Noel, chaplain, from Utica; Calvin Williams, president, from Utica; Zaveon Branch, sergeant-at-arms, from Utica; Darione Maxie, Mr. Hinds AHS, from Edwards; Mrs. Karla Turner-Bailey, advisor, from Utica; and Mykel Evans, reporter, from Utica.

The Hinds AHS Student Government Organization (SGO) wanted to create an atmosphere
of service to the community by selecting a list of potential projects. For the Christmas
season, the group selected a food drive to help the needy. SGO President Calvin
Williams pitched the idea to the advisors, the principal, and the assistant superintendent.
The first phase of the project was a canned goods drive. More than 700 canned
goods and non-perishable items were collected and will be donated during early
December to Stewpot in Jackson. “We want to always be about the business of
service,” says Williams who has planned community service projects (recycling
and the Worldwide AIDS Project) throughout the year.

SGO officers include Calvin Williams, president, a senior, dual enrolled student; Shavonta
Dixon, secretary;  Darnecia West, assistant secretary; A’Naciya Adams, treasurer; Jalisa Mosley, parliamentarian; Zaveon Branch, sergeant at arms; Denarrius Noel, chaplain; Mykel Evans, reporter; Darione Maxie, Mr. Hinds AHS; Kiara Stimage, Miss Hinds AHS; and Dennis Kyles, SGO
member. SGO advisors are Mrs. Karla Turner- Bailey and Mr. Bernard Ross.

Stewpot, which began as a simple soup kitchen, has developed into an organization
offering several different programs- from shelter, to clothing, to counseling,
to children’s programs.

Hinds AHS registering high school students until July 19

Registration is now in progress until July 19 for new students and transfer students, grades 9-12, who plan to attend Hinds Agricultural High School for the 2013-2014 school year.

The designated time for registration is 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday or 8:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. on Tuesday.  Students who have pre-registered should bring their birth certificate, social security card, two proof of residency and final grade report card from the last school they attended in order to complete registration. Transfer students should bring their withdrawal papers, a copy of their transcript, birth certificate and social security card and two proof of residency.

For more information, please call the Principal’s Office at 601.885.7047 or the Counselor’s Office at 601.885.7046.

Hinds Agricultural High School is a school of choice for any student in Hinds County – including the Clinton, Jackson and Hinds County school districts – and students in Copiah and Claiborne counties who have permission from the local school board. It’s located on the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College.

Deajanae

Hinds Agricultural High School enrolling for new academic year

Deajanae Knight of Jackson wasn’t sure she was making the right decision when she left a large Jackson school in the middle of her sophomore year and enrolled at Hinds Agricultural High School.

But the senior who graduates May 19 has flourished in the much smaller rural environment. Hinds Agricultural High School is on the campus of Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. With a senior class of 50 this year, Knight, 18, said she has felt like “more than a number” to her teachers there.

It also helped that her mom is a Hinds AHS graduate. “My mom told me about Hinds,” Knight said. “I didn’t want to leave my old friends but when I came down here I loved it. Everyone was so welcoming and open.”

Knight’s list of activities includes battalion commander of ROTC, Miss Senior Class, National Honor Society and annual staff. She is planning to major in sociology at Alcorn State University this fall.

At the larger high school she attended before, “it’s so competitive. But at Hinds AHS you get an opportunity to stand out and make a difference. That’s what I love the most,” she said.

Attending a high school right on a college campus allowed Knight to take a couple classes through the dual enrollment-dual credit program free of charge, just by walking to the next building.

In the spring she took a beginning college algebra class along with a high school math class. “It really helped me to increase my ACT score in math,” she said.

Hinds Agricultural High School is now enrolling students in ninth-12th grades for the 2013-2014 academic year.

Unlike most other public schools in Mississippi, it’s a school of choice for any student in Hinds County – including the Clinton, Jackson and Hinds County school districts – and students in Copiah and Claiborne counties who have permission from the local school board. It’s the only public high school physically located near the southwest part of Hinds County in the Bolton, Edwards and Utica areas.

Hinds AHS has a 110-year legacy educating mostly African American students. Its graduates include U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Tougaloo College President Beverly Hogan and 2004 Silver Medal Olympian in track Otis Harris.

The school’s enrollment is 58 percent male, and 65 percent of the teachers are male. It boasts a faculty where 90 percent of the teachers have a master’s degree or higher. For the last three years, more than 90 percent of its graduates enrolled in college following high school graduation.

The school has a strong athletic program with football, basketball, track and tennis. Both girls and boys basketball made state playoffs this year.

“My experiences here were awesome,” Knight said. “Nice teachers, welcoming students.”

For information on enrolling, call the school at 601.885.7083.

Hinds AHS Bulldogs

Top level sports plus small environment is success for Hinds AHS students

It was a great year for the Hinds Agricultural High School Bulldogs girls and boys basketball teams, which made it to the “Big House,” also known as the Mississippi Coliseum where the state basketball playoffs are held.

Kaleb Williams

Kaleb Williams

That made it a great year as well for seniors, including Kaleb Williams of Edwards and James Stokes of Utica, both of whom started on the boy’s team.

The chance to compete at state championship level sports, while being in a small 1A school environment, was a good reason for Williams and Stokes to choose Hinds Agricultural High School on the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College.

“It was a great experience,” said Williams, who played point guard. Williams led the Bulldogs, finishing with a team-high 15 points on 5-10 shooting from the field and 5-6 on free throw attempts in the 1A semifinals against Coldwater High.

Williams, one of 50 in the graduating class, said he plans to continue his basketball career at Hinds Community College and major in graphic design. He said the family environment at the small school enabled him to do well.

“The teachers want to see you do well. They don’t like for you to get into trouble,” he said.

Stokes also played a valuable role for Hinds AHS in the season finale, scoring six points and finishing with a team-high in rebounds (seven) and assists (three) in 18 minutes played.

Stokes, who played small forward, also plans to continue playing basketball for Hinds Community College and major in criminal justice.

His four years at Hinds AHS prepared him.  “The teachers teach. They’re very good teachers and I like that so I can be ready for college. They bring it to your perspective. If you don’t get it one way, they’ll bring it another way so you’ll get it,” he said.

The Hinds AHS Bulldogs have a strong athletic program with football, basketball, track and tennis.  In 2012 the boy’s track team was the state champion, with the girl’s team in fourth place.  The girl’s basketball team has a 29-9 record in the district for the last three years, and have stellar winning seasons over the past three years with a 21-7 record this year.

Hinds Agricultural High School is now enrolling students in ninth-12th grades for the 2013-2014 academic year.

Unlike most other public schools in Mississippi, it’s a school of choice for any student in Hinds County – including the Clinton, Jackson and Hinds County school districts – and students in Copiah and Claiborne counties who have permission from the local school board. It’s the only public high school physically located near the southwest part of Hinds County in the Bolton, Edwards and Utica areas.

Hinds AHS has a 110-year legacy educating mostly African American students. Its graduates include U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Tougaloo College President Beverly Hogan and 2004 Silver Medal Olympian in track Otis Harris.

The school’s enrollment is 58 percent male, and 65 percent of the teachers are male. It boasts a faculty where 90 percent of the teachers have a master’s degree or higher. For the last three years, more than 90 percent of its graduates enrolled in college following high school graduation.

For information on enrolling, call the school at 601.885.7083.

Football – Head Coach Michael Fields (All 3 seasons)

2010 – 1-9 record

2011 – 4-8 record

2012 – 6-5 record

Boy’s basketball – Head Coach Keith Williams (All 3 seasons)

2010-11 – 12-14 record

2011-12 – 14-11 record

2012-13 – 14-18 record

Girl’s basketball – Head Coach Bruce Baker (All 3 seasons)

2010-11 – 17-5 record

2011-12 – 27-5 record

2012-13 – 21-7 record

**This includes a 3 year record of 29-0 in the district

Track – Head Coach Michael Fields

2011 – Boy’s 2nd in the state, Girl’s 13th

2012 – Boy’s State Champs, Girl’s 4th

2013 – State Meet is this Saturday

Jasmine Barnes

Easy access to college classes perk of Hinds Agricultural High School

Jasmine Barnes not only has her college path mapped out, she’s also a few steps farther on it than most new high school graduates.

Barnes, 18, graduates from Hinds Agricultural High School on May 19. She plans to major in biology at Jackson State University beginning this fall and afterward head to the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy.

She’ll start her formal college career, however, way ahead after taking eight college classes in high school and four more over the summer. That’s one of the advantages of the dual enrollment-dual credit program offered at Hinds Agricultural High School, on the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College.

“This is helping us get ready. I can just walk across campus to take college classes,” she said. “I had already taken most of my (high school) classes, and I wanted to challenge myself so I’ll be ready for college.”

This spring she took trigonometry and psychology on the college campus. But the background she got at Hinds AHS enabled her to do that. The small high school, with grades 9-12, has a senior class of 50 and treats students as “more than a number,” she said.

“The small classes help you to understand. You have more of a personal relationship with the teachers. They know you,” said Barnes, who is valedictorian of her class.

Plus, she has been able to participate in many activities – National Honor society, annual staff, track.

Hinds Agricultural High School is now enrolling students in ninth-12th grades for the 2013-2014 academic year.

Unlike most other public schools in Mississippi, it’s a school of choice for any student in Hinds County – including the Clinton, Jackson and Hinds County school districts – and students in Copiah and Claiborne counties who have permission from the local school board. It’s the only public high school physically located near the southwest part of Hinds County in the Bolton, Edwards and Utica areas.

Hinds AHS has a 110-year legacy educating mostly African American students. Its graduates include U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Tougaloo College President Beverly Hogan and 2004 Silver Medal Olympian in track Otis Harris.

The school’s enrollment is 58 percent male, and 65 percent of the teachers are male. It boasts a faculty where 90 percent of the teachers have a master’s degree or higher. For the last three years, more than 90 percent of its graduates enrolled in college following high school graduation.

The school has a strong athletic program with football, basketball, track and tennis. Both girls and boys basketball made state playoffs this year.

For information on enrolling, call the school at 601.885.7083.

Family legacy influences many Hinds Agricultural High School students

Nya WilliamsTo Nya Williams, upholding family tradition is important. That’s why enrolling in Hinds Agricultural High School in ninth grade was a no-brainer for the Utica native. “The obvious choice for me was Hinds AHS. The majority of my family members attended here, and I wanted to follow in their footsteps,” said Williams, 17. “I just wanted to experience some of the same things they experienced because they always told me stories and memories they had here. I wanted to relive some of that.”

Senior Jimmie Davies Johnson III, 19, lives in Carpenter. Although his home school would be in Copiah County, like Williams he considered Hinds AHS because of family legacy.“I had siblings who came here previously. They gave me the outlook on why I wanted to come here for high school,” he said. “My oldest brother (Mississippi State University running back Odell Bradley) played football here. The only thing he talked about was that Hinds was a great school and had a great sports program.”

Unlike most other public schools in Mississippi, Hinds Agricultural High School is a school of choice for any student in Hinds County – including the Clinton, Jackson and Hinds County school districts ­– and students in Copiah and Claiborne counties who have permission from the local school board.

Located on Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus, it’s the only public high school physically located near the southwest part of Hinds County in the Bolton, Edwards and Utica areas.

Hinds AHS has a 110-year legacy educating mostly African American students. Its graduates include U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Tougaloo College President Beverly Hogan and 2004 Silver Medal Olympian in track Otis Harris.

Hinds Agricultural High School is now enrolling students in ninth-12th grades for the 2013-2014 academic year.

Many of Hinds AHS’ students take a look at the school because of family ties. But they stay because it’s a great environment for them. For Williams, who represents the school as Miss Hinds AHS, it was also clearly a wise choice. She plans to major in polymer science at the University of Southern Mississippi this fall after the May 19 graduation. She was a starter on the girls’ basketball team, participated in track and field, student government and National Honor Society, in which she serves as president. She also was able to take nine hours of dual credit college classes just by walking to the next building on the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College.

Jimmie Davies Johnson III“Even though we have a small school it’s an advantage because you get to form personal relationships with the faculty, staff and students. You will receive a good education, and it will prepare you for college or for whatever you plan to do after high school,” she said.

Johnson graduates in May with courses that include Advanced Placement English. And also like Williams, he took advantage of the dual enrollment program with Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. He has nine hours of college classes in English, music appreciation and algebra.

“I didn’t want to wait until I got to college and then have to pay out a lot of money and stay in school longer,” said Johnson, who was named Mr. Hinds AHS and is a member of National Honor Society.

The school’s enrollment is 58 percent male, and 65 percent of the teachers are male. It boasts a faculty where 90 percent of the teachers have a master’s degree or higher. For the last three years, more than 90 percent of its graduates enrolled in college following high school graduation.

The school has a strong athletic program with football, basketball, track and tennis. Both girls’ and boys’ basketball made state playoffs at the Mississippi Coliseum this year.